Rfid case study wal-mart

Walmart inventory control

Scanning products automatically reduces administrative error and vendor fraud. Retailers and suppliers will have to work together to solve these issues. So just maybe we will start to again see RFID case-level tagging in retail before the 20th anniversary of the Walmart program launch we'll reach in , at least in soft goods. It has improved a great deal with the advent of UHF tags. Then less than a month after Dillman's bombshell, just as executives were beginning to grasp what it would mean for the retail industry and for suppliers, news reports revealed that Wal-Mart had cancelled a "smart-shelf" trial with The Gillette Co. For instance, IT and business managers will have to figure out when inventory in the storeroom or warehouse needs to be replenished. Send them in at the form below.

That's a hard question to answer. CIOs at retail companies also will have to work with their counterparts in their supply base to find ways to get product to the stores before the stores are sold out of an item.

Sanford C.

Walmart supply chain

Set the trigger too low and you'll run out of product; set it too high and you'll wind up with excess inventory. Because the supply chain management is so important to the success of an organization, RFID technology helps eliminate procedural and information bottlenecks that decrease the efficiency of these departments. So just maybe we will start to again see RFID case-level tagging in retail before the 20th anniversary of the Walmart program launch we'll reach in , at least in soft goods. Then less than a month after Dillman's bombshell, just as executives were beginning to grasp what it would mean for the retail industry and for suppliers, news reports revealed that Wal-Mart had cancelled a "smart-shelf" trial with The Gillette Co. I doubt it. Readers in the storeroom would monitor inventory and alert the distribution center when more product is needed, and so on back through the supply chain. Gilmore Says RFID is not a simple plug-and-play technology.

With those kinds of benefits in sight, it's not hard to understand why the retailer is pushing ahead so aggressively.

As more companies adopt the technology, the price of RFID tags and readers will drop sharply and all kinds of new applications will become economically viable.

walmart rfid chip

The Wal-Mart RFID mandate means its top suppliers not only have to put tags on pallets and cases, they must also install RFID readers in their manufacturing facilities, warehouses and distribution centers. The Transportation Recall Enhancement, Accountability, and Documentation TREAD Act requires automakers to be able to uniquely identify tires on cars from the model year, so the tires can be recalled more effectively.

Walmart operations strategy

A supplier can't simply slap a smart labelone with an RFID tag embedded in iton 60 cases of coffee cans, stack the cases randomly on a pallet and read every tag as a forklift carries the pallet through a dock door at five miles per hour. Retailers are going to have to figure out sensible solutions for hundreds of products with high water content or that are made of metal. Of course, technology does not come without its price. And it's not clear how companies will transition from the universal product code incorporated in bar codes to EPC tags. That's a hard question to answer. The company boosts its bottom line by using smart shelves to monitor on-shelf availability. Set the trigger too low and you'll run out of product; set it too high and you'll wind up with excess inventory. And the benefits of RFID won't be limited to the retail and consumer goods industries. Retailers will need to figure out exactly what information they need, what format it should be in and how it should be shared. That means for the tags to be of any value, suppliers will have to create a database that contains information about what the item is, where it was made, what its expiration date is. But most people thought the proposed EPC standard, which won't be formally introduced until this month, was still too new and too immature to be adopted in open supply chains. And suppliers may have to follow different compliance requirements for different retailers. Related Interests. Wal-Mart declined to comment on why it pulled the smart-shelf test.

And Wal-Mart didn't want to disrupt its in-store operations. Industry experts believe that, given the huge commitment of IT and operational resources necessary to fulfill its mandate, Wal-Mart could not afford to be distracted by a smart-shelf test that wouldn't reap any immediate benefits.

rfid walmart benefits

But you probably couldn't find anybody thinking it would take that long back in

Rated 6/10 based on 64 review
Download
Walmart and RFID